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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, what kind of tyre wear are people getting? I've got a GLA220 AMG Line and have just about got 16,000 miles out of the fronts. I do drive the car quite hard. It has 19" AMG wheels with Continental run flat tyres.

Cheers

Paul
 

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Hi Sprint24
I have same car all fully loaded and have done 10k mls just had a look and my front OS is at 6mm.
Have done two runs to Glasgow from Oxford(56mpg at 70mph on cruise) followed by 100mls day commuting for two months(now retired) and rest is local stuff. I'm happy so far. Have not used the Off Road button other than to check it works. I would imagine that may shorten the life a bit.
 

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A lot of the wear issue will be down to how hard you take corners (particularly whilst also accelerating, given that the GLA is front-wheel drive for 99% of the time), and of course, exactly what the tyre compound is i.e. brand and model of tyre. 'Sporty' or 'performance' tyres give good grip but wear quicker than normal tyres.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the replies, similar to what you say, I'm to the continental tyres are quite a soft compound, so given its driven quite hard, it seems I've done quite well. Just to add to it, I also have a slow puncture in the same tyre (a small nail in centre of tread and been told, punctured can't be repaired on run flats!!!! ( wasn't told that by Mercedes when I ordered the car!) so at least on the bright side, it's both worm down and got a puncture at same time!!!
 

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I always carry one of these in my car > http://www.stopngo.com/pocket-tire-plugger-for-all-tubeless-tires for repairing nail-type punctures by the road-side. Whilst they say it is just a quick-fix to get you to a tyre-repairer, I know loads of super-bike riders who just plug their tyres and carry on pushing their bikes to the limits. I've never heard of one of these repairs failing, and one of my mates had about four in his tyre before it wore out.

However, when it comes to run-flats, I found this post on another forum:

Why can't Run Flat Tyres be repaired?

The reason behind this, given by the tyre manufacturers is to do with the thickness of the RFT sidewalls. With a conventional tyre when a technician carries out a puncture repair, one of the first things they will do is to check the tyre for damage, especially damage to the sidewall. This damage is easy to spot as it shows up as creases in the sidewall when the tyre is deflated. With the RFT it is impossible to say for sure if the sidewall has been damaged as the sidewall is so much thicker. Therefore they have no option but to replace the tyre.

What about a slow puncture?

The damage to the sidewall could occur if you continued to drive on the flat tyre for more than the recommended distance (approx. 100 miles) or over the maximum speed of 50 mph. However what if you'd not driven the tyre at zero pressure, what if the car had been sat on your driveway for a few days and happened to deflate as a result of a slow puncture. Surely this tyre would be repairable? Despite there being no damage to the sidewall you won't find anyone that will repair this RFT tyre, the fact is they only have your word that the tyre had not been driven on at zero pressure and they could run into liability problems if the repaired tyre failed.

Verdict
So are Run Flat Tyres safe to repair? In theory yes they are, as long as they are not driven on.</font>
 

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Got 24K on my factory fitted fronts - looking like they will need changing soon though. Bought the car with 15k on it 4 month ago.
 

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Yes but they say "Depending on how far and at what speed the car was driven after the puncture"</font>, which comes back to the same argument of how does the fitter know, and will they take the driver's word for it? ...probably not if the tyre dealer is a professional outfit with good legal advisers.
 

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Had a nail in the tread of one front wheel which they repaired about six months ago. Took it there within 5km of having had the warning of low pressure. Of course here the backstreet guys aren't going to worry about liabilitiesUntil I read this thread I wasn't even aware that run flats should not be repaired
 

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roytheboy said:
Yes but they say "Depending on how far and at what speed the car was driven after the puncture"</font>, which comes back to the same argument of how does the fitter know, and will they take the driver's word for it? ...probably not if the tyre dealer is a professional outfit with good legal advisers.
National Tyres and ATS DO repair bridgstones, Kwik Fit wont. (Speaking from experience). Obviously it's in your own interests not to lie to them, you're the one likely to crash if you do!
 

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Never, ever buy run flats

I can now speak from personal experience on this.

At 10,000 miles I had a puncture in a front wheel and as it occurred leaving my drive, I travelled less than 400m to turn around and return to my drive.

As it was Sunday eve, I telephoned Mercedes assist and they took 45 minutes to answer and I eventually agreed to leave it to the next morning. In the meantime I went online and phoned around and found the earliest date I could get a new tyre was between 4-6 days !!! They were simply not available anywhere.

I questioned my Mercedes dealer about whether the tyre could be repaired bearing in mind the 400m at a max speed of 20 mph and they said it was their policy not to repair run flats.

I then spoke to Mercedes about the situation and they confirmed that this was Mercedes position as well - no repairs under any circumstances.

So with a half worn tyre punctured, the dealer quoted £277 to replace and a four day wait. The tyre could be purchased slightly cheaper but still with a four/six days delay from tyre dealers but at least Mercedes would provide a loan car.

It seems only last year, that with a spare tyre, you could be on your way in 20 minutes after a puncture and get the old one repaired (or a new one purchased for about half the price of a run flat) and without the four hours plus I have now spent on the phone.

This does not seem to be progress and I can hardly wait for a bill in excess of £1,000 to replace the tyres when they wear out!!!!
 

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Hello Nrmaidment - I am not sure whether you can physically replace the run flats with normal tyres on the same wheels but anyway you would then run into the problem of not having a spare wheel or anywhere to fit it. Perhaps one of the aerosol repairs could be a solution but I have heard mixed reviews of them.


To answer the previous question regarding tyres wear, I am now up to about 13k miles on 19" Continentals and I estimate the front tyres will need replacing within about 500 miles. Most of my journeys are local short distances and hence I don't have the benefit of much motorway driving which may be more efficient in tyres terms.
 

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Mines done 10k miles - I reckon the run flat continental sc5 have another 2-3k miles left in them (235 45 r19).

Also interested in whether non-run flat replacements are an option?
Find run flats abit crashy through pot holes.

What other tyres are people running, particularly on the 19 inch rim and how do they compare comfort and grip wise to the contis?
 

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Non run flat cars have no spare either! Just a useless temp repAir thing that's a fancy aerosol solution.

So, can go non run flat if you want and get an aerosol.

Should replace All tyres at same time though...
 
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